March 29, 2016 at 12:20 am

Cosmic Lessons: Burckle Crater and Megatsunamis – Part 1

by
PDF pageEmail pagePrint page

madagascar, fenambosy chevron, randall carlson, megatsunami, joe rogan, australia,

I concluded last month’s entry with a discussion of very large chevron-shaped deposits found on the southern coast of the island of Madagascar by Dallas Abbott and her colleagues. At a recent December, 2015 meeting of the American Geophysical Union this team presented further evidence supporting their controversial 2006 supposition that these landforms had been produced by gigantic tsunami waves.


Randall explains the evidence for Megatsunamis to Joe Rogan in the above clip.
Read his response to internet critics of his presentation in the following article:
Responses to comments made about Joe Rogan Podcast, An Open Letter to a critic on the Matter of Megatsunamis, Chevrons and Bolide Impacts.

At this October, 2006 Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America in Philadelphia, Abbott and her team presented a paper describing their findings regarding massive chevron deposits found on the world’s coastlines. In the abstract to this paper they point out that,

“Chevron dunes are not formed by wind. Chevron dunes are not oriented in the direction of the prevailing wind, they can form where there are no beaches, and they contain grains larger than 2 mm in diameter. Chevrons are produced by mega-tsunamis originating from point sources, i.e. landslides, impact craters, and volcanic explosions. We have assembled data on chevrons worldwide. Most are best explained as the result of a tsunami generated from large impact cratering events. We now have data confirming an impact origin of two chevron sources. In the Indian Ocean, chevron dunes in Western Australia, India, and Madagascar point towards the 29 km Burckle Crater at 30.865S, 61.365E. The impact ejecta from Burckle crater contain meteorite fragments, impact glass, oceanic mantle fragments, and impact spherules.”

As I mentioned last month, the idea of a cosmic impact produced tsunami being responsible for the Madagascar chevrons has been neither proven nor disproven as the feature in question that appears to be an impact crater lies beneath two miles of ocean water, making verification difficult. However, the finding of impact ejecta in deep sea core samples containing meteorite fragments, impact glass and spherules as well as mantle fragments, all found in the vicinity of what appears to be a large, 16 mile in diameter crater-like structure is powerful evidence that a great meteor did indeed crash into the Indian Ocean. A 16 mile in diameter crater on the ocean bottom beneath 10,000 feet of water would require a meteor, or bolide, at least a mile in diameter moving at something like 20 miles per second when it struck. There is absolutely no question that an oceanic impact of that magnitude would generate very large tsunami waves. (See Abbott, Dallas H. et el. Abstracts for 2006 Philadelphia Annual Meeting G.S.A. 22 – 25 October, Paper No. 119-20. Impact Craters as Sources of Megatsunami Generated Chevron Dunes)

A 16 mile in diameter crater on the ocean bottom beneath 10,000 feet of water would require a meteor, or bolide, at least a mile in diameter moving at something like 20 miles per second when it struck. There is absolutely no question that an oceanic impact of that magnitude would generate very large tsunami waves.

 

In a chapter in the 2009 book Geophysical Hazards: Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Awareness, published as part of the International Year of Planet Earth, authors Viacheslav Gusiakov, Dallas Abbott, Bruce Masse and others, present additional arguments supporting the mega-tsunami hypothesis.

“Although some propose a wind-blown origin for V-shaped chevron dunes that are widely distributed around the coastlines of the Indian Ocean and in the Gulf of Carpentaria, we have evidence in favor of their mega-tsunami formation. In southern Madagascar we have documented evidence for tsunami wave run-up reaching 205 m above sea-level and penetrating up to 45 km inland along the strike of the chevron axis. Subtly the orientation of the dunes is not aligned to the prevailing wind direction, but to the path of refracted mega-tsunami originating from Burckle impact crater.”

(See Gusiakov, V., Abbott, D. H., Bryant, E. A., Masse, W. B., & Breger, D. (2009). Mega tsunami of the world oceans: chevron dune formation, micro-ejecta, and rapid climate change as the evidence of recent oceanic bolide impacts (pp. 197-227). Springer Netherlands.)

Think about what the authors are saying here. A tsunami wave run-up height of 205 meters translates to a wave some 670 feet in height as it makes landfall! If these chevron deposits are, in fact, wave generated, we are not talking about tsunamis produced by earthquakes, as they have a maximum height of 60 to 70 feet. A feature of this scale can only be created by an object from space such as an asteroid 1 to 2 miles in diameter, or possibly a fragment of a comet, crashing into the ocean at a very high velocity. Such an impact into the Indian Ocean would have had consequences for all the lands to which the ocean was contiguous.

So is there evidence of large tsunamis on other coastlines around the Indian Ocean? Well yes, as a matter of fact. The southern and western coasts of Australia preserve evidence of large waves engulfing vast stretches of coastline. If you have downloaded Google Earth like I recommended last month, you can, for example, set the location to 34° 37.368′ S 135° 28.293′ E and the eye altitude to about 40 thousand feet and you will see a sample of these deposits very clearly.

In addition the eastern coast of Africa that is in the direct line of the “strike” or orientation of the Madagascar chevrons also preserves evidence of large scale coastal wash-over deposits. These can be seen by entering the coordinates  3° 16.375′ N  46° 49.409′ E , and again, an eye altitude of about 40 thousand feet  and you will see wave deposits ranging up to about 3 miles inland from the coast.

burckle crater, coffin bay, australia, randall carlson, sacred geometry international,

So the question now begging to be asked is: When were these immense deposits created? I will return to that question directly, but first let us continue with this investigation of cosmic geography. Please locate a map depicting the Indian Ocean and surrounding lands, either on-line, in an atlas or a paper map, it does not matter. (Actually, any reasonably educated person should have a world atlas in their possession if not Google Earth at their disposal) Take some time to study the map.

The area of Burckle crater is about 1000 miles east/southeast from the location of the giant chevrons on the southern tip of Madagascar. Carefully peruse the configuration of the Indian Ocean. Note especially how it tapers to the north as it extends between India on the east and the Arabian Peninsula to the west becoming the Arabian Sea. Observe how the Arabian Sea hooks to the northwest while narrowing into the Persian Gulf, forming a sort of funnel. Note the location of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers flowing into the northern end of the Gulf across a vast lowland plain.

A large scale tsunami, moving outward from an epicenter in the vicinity of Burckle Crater would become focused as it passed into the Arabian Sea and would roll right up into the Persian Gulf. How far inland this tsunami would travel before exhausting itself would depend on the height of the wave and the topographical gradient over which it was moving. But consider this: from the northern coastline of the Persian Gulf at Kuwait, to a point in the Tigris-Euphrates lowland where the elevation rises to at least 500 feet above sea level is more than 500 miles inland. In other words, a 500 or 600 foot tsunami traveling up the Persian Gulf would have nothing to arrest its momentum as it traveled inland a distance of some 500 miles. The entire plain of the Tigris-Euphrates valley would be completely overwhelmed.

Burckle_Crater_Chevrons

I would now strongly suggest to any reader wishing to really develop a picture of the events I am discussing to Google some of the many videos available of the two disastrous tsunami events in recent history – the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 and the Japanese tsunami of 2011. Some of these videos are truly incredible and help to convey an idea of the unimaginable power of this natural force.

As you watch some of these videos try to imagine the power of a tsunami some ten times or more greater in height. It is not too difficult to conceive that survivors (if there were any) who witnessed a tsunami on this scale, could believe that the world itself had been destroyed. Nor is it difficult to conceive that any coastal community in the path of such a tsunami would be utterly and completely erased from existence.

Looking back at your map find the southern tip of India. Note the location of Sri Lanka immediately off the SE of coast of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The horseshoe shaped bay between Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka is called the Gulf of Mannar.  The Tamil people who lived in the vicinity of the Gulf of Mannar have a myth about the time that the “sea rose against the city of Maturai.” The Modern spelling for this city is Madurai and you can find it about 60 miles inland from the Gulf coastline in Tamil Nadu. The myth describes the sea as stopping just short of a shrine near the city which is located some 200 meters (650 feet) above sea level. A wave of this magnitude would make it consistent with the wave assumed to be responsible for the Madagascar chevrons.

krishnas butterball, tamil nadu, megatsunami, boulder,

Giant tsunami deposited boulder at Tamil Nadu near Mahabalipurum

Is it possible that this myth refers to a tsunami generated by the same cosmic impact that allegedly produced Burckle Crater? Are there other myths that possibly could shed additional light on this event? If you cast your gaze to the east, across the Bay of Bengal you will see the large island of Sumatra. Just off the west coast of Sumatra is a string of small islands. The native peoples of these islands tell of the time when their ancestors had to take refuge on mountain peaks that were more than 900 feet above sea level when the seas rose up and swallowed the land.

Are there comparable myths from the Persian Gulf region? Well, it turns out that this region has spawned a series of tales among which are the most well-known of all flood stories, at least to the Judeo-Christian world: that of Noah and his Ark. Is it possible that behind this myth of world destruction by mega-flood, there is a basis in scientific fact? Others have made this assumption but could never amass enough evidence to sway mainstream geological thinking. Now, in the early 21st century enough evidence does exist to absolutely confirm the reality of inconceivably massive floods, floods that have left their imprint on the global landscape on such a vast scale that only within the last decade or two have we been able to perceive it, and only within the past few decades that we could provide a plausible mechanism for generating such events.

While this knowledge is, at present, within the purview of a small but growing number of catastrophist geologists, astronomers, and other scientists, it has fallen completely by the wayside in the public discourse. For the present time politics dominates the discussion of global change, and there is a powerful political incentive to direct the discussion towards anthropogenic forcing to the exclusion of natural forces of change, for human behavior is subject to political control and natural forces of global change are not.

Editors note – If you appreciate these articles please consider supporting the efforts of Sacred Geometry International by making a purchase in our store, becoming a subscribing supporter or sharing this important work with your friends and family. Together we can re-right (rewrite) history. 

Thank you.

Continue on with: Cosmic Lessons: Burckle Crater, Noah’s Flood and Mosul Dam – Part 2


Learn more about the evidence for mega-tsunamis from Randall Carlson w/ Joe Rogan below.

Related articles:

  • darkcontinent

    I concur with the article’s findings.